creating final jar for testing changes made to groovy source code

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creating final jar for testing changes made to groovy source code

Harish Dewan
Hi All,
To solve a probable problem, I forked and clone a git repo (https://github.com/apache/groovy.git ) for groovy and then used this tutorial blog to import project in Intelj Idea ide (http://melix.github.io/blog/2014/06/contribute-groovy-ide.html)  

Then I made the required changes in a subproject.
Now I require final jar file to test if mine changes are correct or not.

so I used this command 'gradlew clean dist' in ide which did the build and generated jar in target/libs folder. 

But when I am trying to use that jar , it does not reflects mine changes. Any idea what am I doing wrong.? or what is the correct procedure for creating final jar so that I can test it,
 but still not clear how the final jar is created to test it ? 

Thanks
Harish 
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Re: creating final jar for testing changes made to groovy source code

jwagenleitner
On Fri, Apr 21, 2017 at 3:17 AM, Harish Dewan <[hidden email]> wrote:
Hi All,
To solve a probable problem, I forked and clone a git repo (https://github.com/apache/groovy.git ) for groovy and then used this tutorial blog to import project in Intelj Idea ide (http://melix.github.io/blog/2014/06/contribute-groovy-ide.html)  

Then I made the required changes in a subproject.
Now I require final jar file to test if mine changes are correct or not.

so I used this command 'gradlew clean dist' in ide which did the build and generated jar in target/libs folder. 

But when I am trying to use that jar , it does not reflects mine changes. Any idea what am I doing wrong.? or what is the correct procedure for creating final jar so that I can test it,
 but still not clear how the final jar is created to test it ? 



The command you ran should have put your changes in subproject/groovy-(module)/target/libs/groovy-(module)-(version).jar and they also should be contained in ./target/libs/groovy-all-(version).jar (uber jar with core and all subprojects).  Maybe it's picking up a different version of groovy from the classpath?

For quickly (5min vs 15min) getting a distribution to test with I like to use the "installGroovy" gradle task which builds a full dist in the "./target/install" directory and from there I can run commands from the bin or add jars from the embeddable (uber jar) or the lib directories.
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Re: creating final jar for testing changes made to groovy source code

Harish Dewan

Thanks John for your reply. Yes problem was with class path. It was picking mine earlier jar. Now problem is solved.

Thanks
Harish


On Apr 21, 2017 9:36 PM, "John Wagenleitner" <[hidden email]> wrote:
On Fri, Apr 21, 2017 at 3:17 AM, Harish Dewan <[hidden email]> wrote:
Hi All,
To solve a probable problem, I forked and clone a git repo (https://github.com/apache/groovy.git ) for groovy and then used this tutorial blog to import project in Intelj Idea ide (http://melix.github.io/blog/2014/06/contribute-groovy-ide.html)  

Then I made the required changes in a subproject.
Now I require final jar file to test if mine changes are correct or not.

so I used this command 'gradlew clean dist' in ide which did the build and generated jar in target/libs folder. 

But when I am trying to use that jar , it does not reflects mine changes. Any idea what am I doing wrong.? or what is the correct procedure for creating final jar so that I can test it,
 but still not clear how the final jar is created to test it ? 



The command you ran should have put your changes in subproject/groovy-(module)/target/libs/groovy-(module)-(version).jar and they also should be contained in ./target/libs/groovy-all-(version).jar (uber jar with core and all subprojects).  Maybe it's picking up a different version of groovy from the classpath?

For quickly (5min vs 15min) getting a distribution to test with I like to use the "installGroovy" gradle task which builds a full dist in the "./target/install" directory and from there I can run commands from the bin or add jars from the embeddable (uber jar) or the lib directories.
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