Java and Groovy class sizes

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Java and Groovy class sizes

pslusarz
just a nugget of data that I played with this weekend:

http://10kftcode.blogspot.com/2013/04/groovy-and-java-class-sizes-in-practice.html

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Re: Java and Groovy class sizes

Guillaume Laforge-4
Interesting study, thanks for sharing the link and the information.

Guillaume



On Wed, Apr 17, 2013 at 3:37 AM, Pawel Slusarz <[hidden email]> wrote:
just a nugget of data that I played with this weekend:

http://10kftcode.blogspot.com/2013/04/groovy-and-java-class-sizes-in-practice.html

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Guillaume Laforge
Groovy Project Manager
Head of Groovy Development at SpringSource
http://www.springsource.com/g2one
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Re: Java and Groovy class sizes

Kendall Shaw
In reply to this post by pslusarz
On 04/16/2013 06:37 PM, Pawel Slusarz wrote:
> just a nugget of data that I played with this weekend:
>
> http://10kftcode.blogspot.com/2013/04/groovy-and-java-class-sizes-in-practice.html
>

Interesting. But, for groovy in particular, there is a very wide range
of coding styles to base the comparison on. Is it people using groovy in
a style that looks like the typical java program, or people basing their
programs on domain specific languages implemented in groovy, or people
using groovy like a scripting language, etc.?

Kendall

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ThisIsHardToRead, asIsThis. This_is_easier, unless_it_is_underlined. This.is.easy. This-is-easy-too. Almost as easy to read as this.


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Re: Java and Groovy class sizes

Guillaume Laforge-4
On Wed, Apr 17, 2013 at 3:49 PM, Kendall Shaw <[hidden email]> wrote:
On 04/16/2013 06:37 PM, Pawel Slusarz wrote:
just a nugget of data that I played with this weekend:

http://10kftcode.blogspot.com/2013/04/groovy-and-java-class-sizes-in-practice.html


Interesting. But, for groovy in particular, there is a very wide range of coding styles to base the comparison on. Is it people using groovy in a style that looks like the typical java program, or people basing their programs on domain specific languages implemented in groovy, or people using groovy like a scripting language, etc.?

That's a very good point, and furthermore, the evolution in time might be interesting to look at as well!
As the learning curve for Groovy is rather flat, that's also because in the beginning, new users write Java code in Groovy, but progressively, they learn various handy new shortcut removing even more boilerplate.
So that'd be interesting to see how the code evolves over time, becoming groovier and groovier :-)

--
Guillaume Laforge
Groovy Project Manager
Head of Groovy Development at SpringSource
http://www.springsource.com/g2one
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Re: Java and Groovy class sizes

Andrew Eisenberg
I also wonder if the move to Java 8 will show a reduction in Java code sizes due to lambdas and simple type inferencing.  It will be interesting to see how Java 8 changes things.


On Wed, Apr 17, 2013 at 7:58 AM, Guillaume Laforge <[hidden email]> wrote:
On Wed, Apr 17, 2013 at 3:49 PM, Kendall Shaw <[hidden email]> wrote:
On 04/16/2013 06:37 PM, Pawel Slusarz wrote:
just a nugget of data that I played with this weekend:

http://10kftcode.blogspot.com/2013/04/groovy-and-java-class-sizes-in-practice.html


Interesting. But, for groovy in particular, there is a very wide range of coding styles to base the comparison on. Is it people using groovy in a style that looks like the typical java program, or people basing their programs on domain specific languages implemented in groovy, or people using groovy like a scripting language, etc.?

That's a very good point, and furthermore, the evolution in time might be interesting to look at as well!
As the learning curve for Groovy is rather flat, that's also because in the beginning, new users write Java code in Groovy, but progressively, they learn various handy new shortcut removing even more boilerplate.
So that'd be interesting to see how the code evolves over time, becoming groovier and groovier :-)

--
Guillaume Laforge
Groovy Project Manager
Head of Groovy Development at SpringSource
http://www.springsource.com/g2one

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Re: Java and Groovy class sizes

Guillaume Laforge-4
True!


On Wed, Apr 17, 2013 at 7:15 PM, Andrew Eisenberg <[hidden email]> wrote:
I also wonder if the move to Java 8 will show a reduction in Java code sizes due to lambdas and simple type inferencing.  It will be interesting to see how Java 8 changes things.


On Wed, Apr 17, 2013 at 7:58 AM, Guillaume Laforge <[hidden email]> wrote:
On Wed, Apr 17, 2013 at 3:49 PM, Kendall Shaw <[hidden email]> wrote:
On 04/16/2013 06:37 PM, Pawel Slusarz wrote:
just a nugget of data that I played with this weekend:

http://10kftcode.blogspot.com/2013/04/groovy-and-java-class-sizes-in-practice.html


Interesting. But, for groovy in particular, there is a very wide range of coding styles to base the comparison on. Is it people using groovy in a style that looks like the typical java program, or people basing their programs on domain specific languages implemented in groovy, or people using groovy like a scripting language, etc.?

That's a very good point, and furthermore, the evolution in time might be interesting to look at as well!
As the learning curve for Groovy is rather flat, that's also because in the beginning, new users write Java code in Groovy, but progressively, they learn various handy new shortcut removing even more boilerplate.
So that'd be interesting to see how the code evolves over time, becoming groovier and groovier :-)

--
Guillaume Laforge
Groovy Project Manager
Head of Groovy Development at SpringSource
http://www.springsource.com/g2one




--
Guillaume Laforge
Groovy Project Manager
Head of Groovy Development at SpringSource
http://www.springsource.com/g2one
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Re: Java and Groovy class sizes

pslusarz
In reply to this post by Guillaume Laforge-4
On 4/17/13 9:58 AM, Guillaume Laforge wrote:

> That's a very good point, and furthermore, the evolution in time might
> be interesting to look at as well!

Here's breakdown year by year, based on last mod date:

2008, total: 3, median: 11, average 11.3333333333
2009, total: 111, median: 15, average 29.2522522523
2010, total: 468, median: 27, average 42.1196581197
2011, total: 854, median: 31, average 55.9964871194
2012, total: 2327, median: 34, average 63.9252256124
2013, total: 1918, median: 57, average 92.7111574557

Just so I am not misunderstood, I have interest in data. I enjoy my
Groovy as much as the next guy.


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Re: Java and Groovy class sizes

pslusarz
In reply to this post by Kendall Shaw
On 4/17/13 8:49 AM, Kendall Shaw wrote:

> Interesting. But, for groovy in particular, there is a very wide range
> of coding styles to base the comparison on. Is it people using groovy in
> a style that looks like the typical java program, or people basing their
> programs on domain specific languages implemented in groovy, or people
> using groovy like a scripting language, etc.?

Groovy is used at Carfax as a general purpose programming language in
place of Java (no dsl and no scripting). About half the files are in
Grails apps, and the other half are in a hodgepodge of various other
applications, sometimes only used in tests. I just looked at a couple of
our Grails apps that get the most code quality attention possible, and
their average loc is in the high 70s. On the surface, there appears to
be some correlation to application size and average loc. I will report
back if I find anything interesting, although it may not be Groovy
specific by then.



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